FAQ
It is currently Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:45 am


Author Message
Roamer
Post  Post subject: The first queen colony?  |  Posted: Fri Jul 07, 2017 4:29 pm

Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2016 4:27 pm
Posts: 62

Offline
I have been looking around OneZoom.org.
It was extremely interesting!
I was scrolling through the tree and I stumbled upon a node called "Ants, bees, and wasps".
What was the common ancestor of ants, bees, and wasps?
People argue about what use are half-circulatory system, or half-eye, or half-wings.
Those can be well explained.
The existence of queen colonies in onezoom was so sudden.
A species can only be a queen colony, or a non-queen colony.
How does half-queen colony make sense?
What was the first queen colony?

Does a creature that makes one offspring considered a queen?
How about a creature that makes two offspring?
Three? Four? Five?

What characteristics must be met for a species to be a queen colony?

Are human families considered "queen colonies"?


Top
paleoichneum
Post  Post subject: Re: The first queen colony?  |  Posted: Sat Jul 08, 2017 2:51 am
User avatar
Original Member
Original Member

Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:23 am
Posts: 509

Offline
Roamer wrote:
I have been looking around OneZoom.org.
It was extremely interesting!
I was scrolling through the tree and I stumbled upon a node called "Ants, bees, and wasps".
What was the common ancestor of ants, bees, and wasps?
People argue about what use are half-circulatory system, or half-eye, or half-wings.
Those can be well explained.
The existence of queen colonies in onezoom was so sudden.
A species can only be a queen colony, or a non-queen colony.
How does half-queen colony make sense?
What was the first queen colony?

Does a creature that makes one offspring considered a queen?
How about a creature that makes two offspring?
Three? Four? Five?

What characteristics must be met for a species to be a queen colony?

Are human families considered "queen colonies"?

The thing is, there are ants and wasps that have multiple queens, and ones that have in essence, none. There are wasps that do not from colonies at all, and ants whos colonies are only in the double digits.
The colony structure started as a mutual habitation structure as still seen in many of the parasitic wasp groups that colony forming groups are descended from.

i would start with looking over this page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eusociality

_________________
The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.


Top
gbalkam
Post  Post subject: Re: The first queen colony?  |  Posted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:09 pm
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2016 8:19 pm
Posts: 32

Offline
What characteristics must be met for a species to be a queen colony?

only 1. Only 1 female lays eggs in a queen colony. If a colony has 2 fertile females, one kills the other or drives them from the hive.

Are human families considered "queen colonies"?

No. There can be more than one fertile female in a human family, although normally, these do not breed within the "hive". However, you can have the Mother of the family, and a daughter pregnant by her boyfriend but still living at home. In this case.. 2 fertile females, which can not exist in a hive.


Top
paleoichneum
Post  Post subject: Re: The first queen colony?  |  Posted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 9:11 pm
User avatar
Original Member
Original Member

Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:23 am
Posts: 509

Offline
gbalkam wrote:
What characteristics must be met for a species to be a queen colony?

only 1. Only 1 female lays eggs in a queen colony. If a colony has 2 fertile females, one kills the other or drives them from the hive.

Are human families considered "queen colonies"?

No. There can be more than one fertile female in a human family, although normally, these do not breed within the "hive". However, you can have the Mother of the family, and a daughter pregnant by her boyfriend but still living at home. In this case.. 2 fertile females, which can not exist in a hive.

The term "queen colony" is odd. I would say it would be better not to use it, since its not one that is defined.

Social colony dwelling hymenopterans are what the op was talking about. Humans are not the same at all in that way.

Also, it is incorrect to assert that colonies only have one queen. Many species of ants and a number of wasp/bee species have 2 or more laying queens.

_________________
The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.


Top
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Print view

Who is online
Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
Jump to:   


Delete all board cookies | The team | All times are UTC


This free forum is proudly hosted by ProphpBB | phpBB software | Report Abuse | Privacy