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Zinjanthropos
Post  Post subject: Are Old Science (Text)Books Worth Keeping?  |  Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 5:32 pm
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Not because of the historical value aspect of old books but because of the rapidity of change in the science disciplines or new science. Out with the old, in with the new they say. Does the constant change in the scientific landscape make old science obsolete and worthless as a reference? I can easily find old science books in libraries and when someone like myself can see that the information in them has gone the way of the Dodo, I have to wonder if anyone cares or whether a library is a good dumping ground for out of date reference material. I'm thinking that the best thing to do for old science text is to recycle the paper or is that too harsh. This stuff is probably on databases also, so who actually accesses old scientific literature for information these days?

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"Science is much better than religion because our faith is shakeable. There can be something I believe with all my heart to be absolutely true, and the minute there's evidence that it isn't true, I throw it out like yesterday's garbage"-Krauss


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Zinjanthropos
Post  Post subject: Re: Are Old Science (Text)Books Worth Keeping?  |  Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:39 pm
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Whoops forgot to insert news story and opening preamble

Here's an old science book that is still in use. Is it an anomaly? Is there still a lot of old science worth reading?http://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=11797586

Not because of the historical value aspect of old books but because of the rapidity of change in the science disciplines or new science. Out with the old, in with the new they say. Does the constant change in the scientific landscape make old science obsolete and worthless as a reference? I can easily find old science books in libraries and when someone like myself can see that the information in them has gone the way of the Dodo, I have to wonder if anyone cares or whether a library is a good dumping ground for out of date reference material. I'm thinking that the best thing to do for old science text is to recycle the paper or is that too harsh. This stuff is probably on databases also, so who actually accesses old scientific literature for information these days?

_________________
"Science is much better than religion because our faith is shakeable. There can be something I believe with all my heart to be absolutely true, and the minute there's evidence that it isn't true, I throw it out like yesterday's garbage"-Krauss


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iNow
Post  Post subject: Re: Are Old Science (Text)Books Worth Keeping?  |  Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:11 pm
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Depends on the topic, but as a general rule I'd say, yes. Many of things shared in textbooks are pretty foundational, and while updates are made, the same can be said of information in ANY medium.

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"[Time] is one of those concepts that is profoundly resistant to a simple definition." ~C. Sagan


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wireless
Post  Post subject: Re: Are Old Science (Text)Books Worth Keeping?  |  Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:14 pm

Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 9:55 am
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Newtonian Mechanics was enough to put man on the moon. Newton's books are here there and everywhere.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_mechanics


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Lynx_Fox
Post  Post subject: Re: Are Old Science (Text)Books Worth Keeping?  |  Posted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 3:27 am

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Echo a few others in that it really depends on the field. In my field, meteorology and by extension climate science, hasn't changed much in the past 4-5 decades--the changes in those fields have been able to apply increasing computer power to known physics to resolve and improve geographic and temporal resolution as well as convert many formerly parameterized parameters into more rigorous physical equations. The new stuff would be the application of that processing power and in some cases observational improvement to understand the property and organization of mesoscale structures.

In other fields though, such as biology, there's been a huge progress, even the past decade or two about the fundamentals of things like cell and micro-organal functions.


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