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bunbury
Post  Post subject: Glass from banana skins?  |  Posted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 2:50 pm
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Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 5:55 am
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Location: Denver, Colorado

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School of Mines researchers have produced glass from food waste using a process that extracts minerals such as silica from the waste. The process requires high temperatures in a furnace which makes me skeptical as to its eventual viability and its claimed environmental benefit, but no doubt this will all be worked out as the engineers do their calculations.

I'm also skeptical about this statement:

Quote:
"I mean, this was rotten garbage," Cornejo said of a 60-gram piece of clear glass. The banana, rice husk and eggshells weighed 240 grams before cooking.


This says that 25% of the mass of banana skins, eggshells and rice husks is silica, which I find difficult to believe.

http://www.denverpost.com/environment/c ... bage-glass


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marnixR
Post  Post subject: Re: Glass from banana skins?  |  Posted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 4:31 pm
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Location: Cardiff, Wales

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egg shells ? and here i was thinking eggshells were made of calcium carbonate ?

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bunbury
Post  Post subject: Re: Glass from banana skins?  |  Posted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 7:12 pm
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Agreed. At this point I simply don't know how one can get significant amounts of SiO2 from banana skin or eggshells, but it turns out that rice husks are actually a good source of silica. Maybe the dry banana skins are just a fuel supplement, and the calcium carbonate is there to absorb sulfur or some other obnoxious component.

Quote:
Rice husk can be characterized as a biomass rich in Si, but poor in Ca, K.The analysis indicates SiO2 of over 75%, but it can, in many cases contain over 90%, making it very different from the straws of other cereals and even rice straw ash. As identified earlier, this is a valuable raw material suited to many industrial purposes.


http://www.dpcleantech.com/biomasslab/e ... /rice-husk


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